NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration Government Organization

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Explore the universe and discover our home planet with the official NASA page on Facebook. Visit us at http://www.nasa.gov

Explore the universe and discover our home planet with the official NASA page on Facebook. Visit us at http://www.nasa.gov

About us

For more than 60 years, NASA has been breaking barriers to achieve the seemingly impossible—from walking on the Moon to pushing the boundaries of human spaceflight farther than ever before. We work in space and around the world in laboratories and wind tunnels, on airfields and in control rooms to explore some of life’s fundamental mysteries: What’s out there in space? How do we get there? And what can we learn that will make life better here on Earth?

We are passionate professionals united by a common purpose: to pioneer the future in space exploration, scientific discovery and aeronautics research. Today, we continue NASA’s legacy of excellence and innovation through an unprecedented array of missions. We are developing the most advanced rockets and spacecraft ever designed, studying the Earth for answers to critical challenges facing our planet, improving the air transportation experience, and so much more.

Join us as we reach for new heights and reveal the unknown for the benefit of humanity.

Facebook

News

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration
It's inhospitable. It's a hellscape. It will literally crush you. But that's why we want to go back. 🔥

Once similar to Earth, Venus hides a wealth of information that could help us better understand why both planets went down completely different paths: https://go.nasa.gov/34dVT8L
It's inhospitable. It's a hellscape. It will literally crush you. But
8 hours ago
It’s incredibly beautiful.  8 
7 hours ago
I'm impressed with the moons of Saturn and Jupiter. So diverse, so many different types.  3 
7 hours ago
Melissa Stewart Amos Callisto...need to check it out...Titan was always my fave!  1 
7 hours ago
James Walper yes yes yes!!! They’re amazing. And now with the ones we just found around Saturn, there are so many. My fave is Callisto.
7 hours ago
What would be interesting is to see a new generation of lander, capable of withstanding the temperatures, sulfuric acid, and pressures of the atmosphere, descend into it - and to obtain real-time photos (if not video) of that descent. There has been recent work in ceramic chips that might just make such work possible. Yes, we should study Venus much more. It's nearby and it's been a long time.  5 
7 hours ago
Hmmm. As I understand, Venus is only at an average distance of about 67 million miles from the sun, while the Earth is at an average distance of 93 million miles. I know I'm not a climate expert, but perhaps that difference in distance from the sun has a bit to do with it.  2 
7 hours ago
No, actually Venus' atmosphere is responsible for that. It causes a greenhouse effect. Like being inside a car in a sunny day with no air conditioning.
7 hours ago
Google "Venus Zone."
7 hours ago
Correct Brian. Venus is outside the goldilocks zone. So is Mars.
7 hours ago
Brian Forbes it's possible, but it's also anomalous. I mean, don't you think that, if in the past Venus had obtained a stable system atmospheric and oceanic plus geologic, this would continue through eons? Why it changed? The Sun had basically the same life that today, without particular events. Today like in past the star had the same behavior and nobody, on Venus, today, change. So why in past, with a different situation, it changed? There was an equilibrium in that system like there is an equilibrium in the present day system of Venus. I think the causes of the massive change must be sought in some external phenomena, like an impact with a giant celestial body. We have proofs about this impacts on Earth in at least two times. The first made our Moon, the second is the reason why dinosaurs are not alive. Even Mars have signs of a massive catastrophic event like this. Looking at the structure of the red planet, we can see a southern emisphere with more altitude than the northern one. If I remember correctly, astronomers say that this is imputable to another giant collision in the past of the solar system and, in this case, in the past geological history of Mars. Seems that in past, there was still enough big celestial bodies that traveled across solar system causing some chaos. This Era probably is yet not finished. But, unlike the past, the dimensions of this "bodies" are far slightly than in past. This means that or the big ones are definitely devoured by the Sun and the gas giants, or this celestial bodies are now out of the Solar system, launched out by gravitational effects. This very grav effects are probably the main cause of the precedent chaos that bring us our Moon, Mars it's characteristics shape and Venus its massive change in geological and atmospheric composition. We can also assume that one of this big impacts had the power to reverse the rotation of Venus and impress a slow counter rotation that right now make it characteristic among the planets of our solar system. You know, when planets are about to form up, they takes form like the sun, in gravitation aspects. What means? If a planet is forming in orbit of a star, it's the star, with its gravity, to bring the planet, to move it, and by effect, impress to it the rotation on its own axis. This means that, if we see a planet that not rotate like the star, this object probably it suffer an event that give it a noticeable change for a considerable period of time. That's the case of Venus and moreover for a number of other planets and moons in the Sol System. Like Uranus for example. But, in that case, I really can't figure out what is happened in past for make a planet orbit with an inclination of 97° from the Sol axis.
7 hours ago
Actually less solar radiation hits the surface of Venus, than Earth today. It just show how potent the greenhouse effect is. So should we gamble our own planet, or play it safe and reduce emissions?
7 hours ago
AFAIR Venus atmosphere is 97% CO2, hence temperature up to 800 Celsius. Mercury, which is much closer, has lower temperatures. Greenhouse effect at its finest.
7 hours ago
Funny.... can’t even take a photo of another planet? It has to be stitched together?! What... is it to far away to get the whole thing in focus now... such a joke  1 
7 hours ago
Translation: Daniel doesn't understand what NASA post is about.  8 
7 hours ago
Daniel James Heck these are radar images of the surface from the magellan mission. It has to make several passes to get a full radar image of the surface. So theres going to be some imperfections. Remember, this is the only way to fully see the surface of venus since the atmosphere is too thick  8 
7 hours ago
My goodness, another crazy person who sees the world through conspiracies. Yikes.  7 
7 hours ago
"planet?" 😂 EDIT: Since y'all can't keep up, I'm laughing here at Daniel who said "planet" in quotes in one of his comments. 🙄  3 
7 hours ago
What are you even talking about?  2 
7 hours ago
Look at the bottom of the “planet”  1 
7 hours ago
What an incredible image.
7 hours ago
Actually, it’s our fault. Venus was Earth Prime. We let our technology and unwavering greed get the better of us. It is the home of Atlantis. However, since they couldn’t stop the self imposed destruction, they decided to start anew on the sister planet that seemed prime for a fresh start. It already had a humanoid population. So the few chosen were sent to earth to help seed advancement in hopes of preventing the same fate. Hence, all the things we can’t duplicate that somehow exist. But that knowledge was lost to the ages and destruction of man.
7 hours ago
Heavenlyfire Kenshin which drugs are you on currently  2 
7 hours ago
Maciej Merlin Moroz can you clarify that please?
7 hours ago
It’s impossible it happened in 7.000 years!
7 hours ago
7 hours ago
      
NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration
When part of our Deep Space Network suffered an unexpected network outage, the NASA's OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission team hatched a daring plan to keep the mission on schedule. They managed to squeeze a 24-hour trajectory update into less than four hours, and in doing so, downlinked key images of the asteroid Bennu. https://go.nasa.gov/2ROTRJo
9 hours ago
interesting with the similarity in equitorial heat and polar coolness to earth  1 
9 hours ago
Amazing video  1 
9 hours ago
spacegram, asteroidbook and whatsun were all down ? :-P
9 hours ago
in English, please (and can we skip forward...into the time that we should care more) I said 'more' ! :)
9 hours ago
Thank u . Evil outage !
7 hours ago
Amazing video,,,
      
NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Our #ParkerSolarProbe has returned gigabytes of data on the Sun and its atmosphere, leading to new findings about solar wind, space dust and sun storms. While seemingly calm from Earth, our closest star is a surprisingly active system with far-reaching effects in our solar system: https://go.nasa.gov/2YJ97cj
10 hours ago
Very nice the vision of the sun
7 hours ago
Very beautiful the sun,,,
7 hours ago
Those waves of light?That's why itches the skin when sun is Up there?
9 hours ago
Soldiering through the brutal solar flares perpetually & sending home astonishing data to fetch into our repertoire
9 hours ago
How much data will we have from the Sun in the future with these studies?🤔
11 hours ago
Glad to be aboard.
      
NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration
🦅 It’s a bird!
✈️ It’s a plane!
🌍 It’s 5 of our newest NASA Earth airborne campaigns!

Our place isn't JUST in space? From the land, the sea and the sky, we study our planet up close. Get to know our new expeditions taking flight in 2020: https://go.nasa.gov/2LO0kRk
🦅 It’s a bird!✈️ It’s a plane!🌍 It’s 5 of our newest
12 hours ago
Oh look at that! So nice and round!  9 
11 hours ago
That's artificial curve created by using a wide-angle, or fisheye lens.  4 
11 hours ago
Johnny Vaselino oh shut up, vaseline man. Get lost.  3 
9 hours ago
April Womack the existence of those lenses is not proof that one was used for this particular picture. So, I say again. Prove it.  3 
9 hours ago
Poor dumb Johnny. Too bad he blocked me. He was fun.  2 
10 hours ago
Johnny Vaselino prove it.  2 
10 hours ago
Dan Sanders look at a a few pictures of the difference fisheye lenses and regular ones make. There's a ton out there
12 hours ago
Wow! That is an awesome picture!  6 
11 hours ago
Oktov Tentakel I can't reveal the source. 😛
12 hours ago
Abraham Samuel where did you get it??
12 hours ago
Wow, it's amazing😍💜💜 Is this the Delta?
7 hours ago
Lake Pontchartrain to the right.
7 hours ago
Seeing that thin layer of atmosphere always reminds me how fragile this world is. Awesome pics.
7 hours ago
I would love to jump from this height.
9 hours ago
...love that 'Blue Line' on the Horizon...! 🌏
      
NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Where should our first astronauts on the Red Planet land? A new “treasure” map shows water ice on Mars — a key consideration for any human landing site: https://go.nasa.gov/36s5YAp #AGU19
13 hours ago
I'm just waiting for the first contact war, so we can discover the mass relays and live on the citadel before the reapers annihilate all the major sentient races during the mid-centamillenium harvest. This *is* the goal, right? Because listen. I need this. I call dibs on the first Commander Shepard vi. Sorry, Christine Shane 🤣  3 
12 hours ago
Megan Kelly now I want to play
9 hours ago
Isn't that right, Stacy?
12 hours ago
I'm Commander Shepard and this is my favorite idea on the Citadel.
14 hours ago
People in this country are living in tents. Maybe we could make affordable housing on Mars.  2 
14 hours ago
Try lobbying the military to do that with their huge budget. I'm sure they can rustle up some loose change from behind a bunker.  6 
12 hours ago
The poor couldn't afford the flight
14 hours ago
Land where the water is! So far you have sent so many rovers, etc. but not since the first mission have any of them had life science experiments on them. Why not? Why have you not sent any more vehicles capable of determining if life is there? I love NASA. Lets go man!!!  2 
14 hours ago
Scott Niles the next rover in 2020 does just that! 🤓  3 
12 hours ago
No Problem, We will send you the bill.
9 hours ago
Kyle V. Hughes It is a simple science experiment. Not costly at all.
14 hours ago
It will be the Most Flattest Bering Out in the Middle Of "Nowhere place They Can Find To Be "Safe".:) You can bet on it.:(
11 hours ago
I'm thinking a place near water-ice; so certainly the upper latitudes. But with plenty of canyons in which one can build shelters into the rock to avoid the ambient radiation. Places where there are likely to be already usable cave systems would be ideal for siting bases to protect our humans.
14 hours ago
I would first mine helium 3 on the moon, set up a refueling station for the Earth's rockets there, develop a propulsion system for it and then fly to Mars, in a faster, heavier and cheaper time. Build houses, machine parts or machines on Mars with a 3D printer, ensure the water supply for the people and generate energy from water or hydrogen for...etc. It‘s only my opinion😉 Good luck! 🍀
12 hours ago
you going to pay for all of this?
9 hours ago
We cannot use H3. There is no quantifiable time frame in which we can use H3. Disabuse yourself of the notion.
10 hours ago
Kyle V. Hughes the new industry for H3 would help pay for it.
      
NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration
“I just watched the Earth going by below me and the only thing separating it was just my visor...”
Anne McClain of NASA Astronauts recalls her first spacewalk and how it changed her perception of Earth: https://go.nasa.gov/36nIg8l
1 day ago
My daughter is five and has been obsessed with space for as long as she's known about it. She currently hopes to be an astronaut some day. After watching this video, I hope she never gives up on that. Amazing. Just amazing.  23 
20 hours ago
I hope so too. 😊  1 
22 hours ago
Nina Lindén you know me anything to help out
20 hours ago
Katie Bates you look about 33 years old. You can probably go for 3 more children. Have you ever dated a black guy ? We have a secret sauce. Im 42 years old but feel like 21...don't be scared to step through the dark side...lol Ill hold my breath waiting for that day 😉
20 hours ago
I'm married and you're creepy. Also blocked 🙄
22 hours ago
Don't know what's so funny about kids' dreams or the beauty of space, but you do you, kids.
22 hours ago
Bobby Smith Aww, thought I might find you here doing nice favours 🤗😂
1 day ago
Working in space must be the most amazing experience. And so few get to actually live it.  2 
18 hours ago
So amazing ! I hope to live long enough see our astronauts walk on other planets and maybe make a home on the moon!!!!  1 
13 hours ago
good to hear from you again @Astroannimal it is so beautiful to see working with the earth at your feet !!! Wow I suppose the love for Mother Earth has grown ever since. This was once my big dream, glad to see that you made it.
1 day ago
I have no objection to being an actual volunteer in experiments, living, researching, aspiring, or going to the farthest limits of space. Miniature or semi-idea. You will have the time to rise to a future that precedes the estimated actual time of 3000 years and living is possible, or is it certain?
15 hours ago
Amazing story, thank you so much for sharing Anne! I hope it inspires not only our youth to reach for the stars but the global cooperation needed to go explore them!
      
NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration
👨‍🚀 NASA’s Orion Spacecraft completed
🚀 NASA's Space Launch System rocket core stage assembled
📝 Artemis I launch testing underway

We’ve made major progress in 2019 towards our upcoming Moon missions! Here’s where we stand in the #Artemis story and what to expect in 2020: https://go.nasa.gov/36lIuNb
👨‍🚀 NASA’s Orion Spacecraft completed🚀 NASA's Space Laun
1 day ago
This is a huge undertaking! I'm sure everybody wishes you luck.  3 
1 day ago
Not everyone. There's a lot of people that know nasa is not a space agency  3 
1 day ago
Christopher McGinn Ok then Everybody that cares. I don't speak for everyone, even tho I believe in their motives and work, as well as their past achievements.I personally wish them luck and total success.  2 
1 day ago
Christopher McGinn yes, they know it, but yet don’t have any evidence whatsoever to show how they know it... 😂  1 
1 day ago
Luke Smith dumb a-- block
11 hours ago
Christopher McGinn After all, there's a lot of people that know there's a tooth fairy...but eventually they outgrow it. Reality never cared about popular opinion. But hey, you can go see it eventually launch for yourself...
1 day ago
Sign me up! Waited 50 years for this. I'll pilot that test rocket into orbit and back. I volunteer! Light that candle!  3 
1 day ago
Marc Palo dumb a-- block
20 hours ago
Marc Palo Need a co-pilot?
1 day ago
Let's not forget: they finished casting all 10 sections of the two solid rocket boosters as well! I don't recall the parts being assembled together yet, but the hard parts are all over. Next up is the Green Run test of the Core stage, where it will prove that it's capable of real-world performance: both loading and unloading, as well as an 8-minute static fire of the booster, exactly like it will when it launches off the ground. Everything's coming together for actually making the Artemis 1 flight happen within a year from now!  3 
1 day ago
I'm getting old. Hope to see an SLS launch before I assume room temperature. But somehow, with all the delays, testing and teasing, I doubt it.
1 day ago
I was so sad the launch couldn’t take off when I went to see it on a Thursday due to a valve not closing. Yet, happy to hear it took off the next morning!
16 hours ago
Richard Strope oh, I just saw Orion. I see this is Artemis. Lol
18 hours ago
Christian Perez wrong rocket. But every launch is good to hear.
1 day ago
Enormous challenge. Congratulations on the success!
      
NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration
NASA’s Curiosity Mars Rover is getting a friend!

Next summer, #Mars2020 will be headed for the Red Planet. While the newest rover borrows from Curiosity's design, they aren't twins. Curiosity was designed to learn more about past water on Mars, and Mars 2020 will look for signs of past life. Learn more: https://go.nasa.gov/38vn0Q7
NASA’s Curiosity Mars Rover is getting a friend!Next summer, #Mars
1 day ago
Is there a particular reason we couldn't send a dozen of these to the moon? A shorter trip by a matter of days to months. The control interface would be almost instant. We could be exploring the whole of the moon with one large enough lander to drop them off. Maybe a good project/test/mission for the new Orion.  21 
1 day ago
Steve Jones you're not going to get a lander big enough to drop off 100 🤣 But agree that they should send them there. I guess the reasoning is that the chance of life ever being on mars is a lot higher than that of the moon  5 
1 day ago
Money.  2 
1 day ago
Steve Jones flange it up. Make a name for yourself.  1 
1 day ago
John Cooper Not so much interested in the search for ancient microbes. Those can be found when space-based infrastructure makes it cheaper. I would like to see the dozen rovers looking on the Moon for water, useful metals, basically where anything that would make exploring our solar system easier/cheaper is located in bulk. The Moon and the asteroids at our LaGrange points are far more interesting to me at the moment than putting a lander on Mars.  1 
1 day ago
Rob Bosher, I said a dozen, but a hundred would be good overall. It would take a few years, though.
1 day ago
Hey man there is nothing on moon and we have already discovered it enough as campared to mars.
1 day ago
What is the difference between the two? Past water and past life? Where water is, life thrives and where there was once water, life did thrive? Why not develop new instruments to probe solid minerals? This is simple logic @NASA  3 
22 hours ago
Akpanevbuak Chukwujekwu Nduba JP no. Water is everywhere all through the universe. it does not mean life. It means life is possible  10 
21 hours ago
"Confirmation" doesn't mean "we know exactly where useable sources are" or "how water cycles on Mars." Think about it yourself.  10 
19 hours ago
Life has been found with 0% Sunlight and 0% water they are called extremophiles. That should tell us alone that water and sunlight are not required for life. It is just common and required for OUR carbon based life.  6 
19 hours ago
Akpanevbuak Chukwujekwu Nduba JP they use completely different tests, therefore they need different equipment 🤦‍♀️ think about it  3 
21 hours ago
Dion Ermen If water is confirmed on Mars why send a probe to investigate? Think about it!  1 
19 hours ago
Casey Bemis Guys we keep searching 🙄🙄🙄
1 day ago
These programs are great but I keep wondering why NASA has such a limited focus. All the money, design time, distance, and the things don't really do a lot. For all the money spent I'd really expect a little more. It's so disappointing. It's like 'That's it?" All that time and money. C'mon guys. Put something out there more substantial.  2 
1 day ago
Kevin Keely You're are too accustomed to their achievements. Putting anything on Mars is a massive undertaking.  6 
1 day ago
NASA has one of the highest return on investment of any research department. They also have had the most commercial success of technology developed  5 
1 day ago
What do you expect, Kevin? Ancient alien weapons? Million year old fusion technology just under a fine layer of dust?  2 
1 day ago
I suggest you watch the documentary on Spirit and Opportunity so you understand how many missions failed reaching Mars.  1 
1 day ago
That's just one mission to.
1 day ago
Kevin Keely how much would it cost for you to build a robot that can learn these things, withstand all it has to go through on Mars and get to mars and communicate back to earth where you have teams of people keeping it going and researching all the data?
1 day ago
I hope they take a selfie together before getting on with their work! And they can sing eachother happy birthday! ❤  1 
1 day ago
The speed and scale that the US Mars and Space programs are moving forward with is simply amazing.
1 day ago
Curious what region may end up as the site for the research. Suppose a probable location may be the shorelines of the ancient oceans.
      
NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration
New images and science from the ionosphere (the region where Earth's atmosphere meets space)! See the first light of our NASA Sun Science ICON mission, results from our GOLD instrument, and observations of this fleeting, never-before-studied aurora: https://go.nasa.gov/2se59wb
1 day ago
We are very unique. And fragile.  4 
1 day ago
Steve Mathers . Adjectives make up about 20% of English words. Some are modified frequently: very heavy, extremely tall, mostly sunny, seriously flawed. But a substantial majority are rarely modified, not because of any grammatical rule, but simply because their meanings are so technical or specific that they don’t need to be. With that said, if Professor Burnham of Eng Lit at NMSU says I’m wrong, then by God I’m wrong. But I’m not taking your word for it. Have a nice day. 😊  1 
1 day ago
Steve Mathers . But duly noted. 😉
1 day ago
Joe Fitzgerald "unique" is an absolute. You can't be "very unique". We're either unique or not.
1 day ago
Aurora Borealis Observatory This is how the new looks of it is from the all-new GOLD instrument on the ICON misson. A new way-of-view onto the fantastic phenomenons there in e.g. Norway.  2 
1 day ago
It's such an amazing thing to capture❤️❤️.... aaaaannddd scary at the same time 😅🙄😱  1 
1 day ago
Sami Shehab yeah so true its amazing ♥️
22 hours ago
Sami Shehab omg this thing look like you exactly
22 hours ago
1 day ago
I think it is because these particles that come from the sun to the earth through that loop of how many of the magnetized energies to collide with the earth ionize forming beautiful greenish lights should smell clean there or egg
1 day ago
Great.
21 hours ago
Amazing 🙂
      

Youtube